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MOTHER'S DAY AROUND THE WORLD: THE AMAZING TRADITIONS AND CELEBRATIONS HONORING WOMEN AND MOTHERS INTERNATIONALLY

MAY 2024
21
MOTHER'S DAY AROUND THE WORLD: THE AMAZING TRADITIONS AND CELEBRATIONS HONORING WOMEN AND MOTHERS INTERNATIONALLY

With Mother’s Day right around the corner, Fox in a Box Stockholm would like to help celebrate the incredible women in our lives with some interesting facts and trivia about Mother’s Day, and how it is celebrated around the world, as well as share a special offer just for the amazing women in your lives! Stay tuned to the end of this article for a Mother’s Day discount!


Mother’s Day is a special occasion celebrated worldwide that dates back to the Middle Ages, and while honoring mothers is universal across the world, the traditions and customs around Mother’s Day vary beautifully from one culture to the next. Join us as we highlight the unique ways people around the world celebrate Mother’s Day!


Mother’s Day is a special occasion celebrated worldwide that dates back to the Middle Ages, and while honoring mothers is universal across the world, the traditions and customs around Mother’s Day vary beautifully from one culture to the next. Join us as we highlight the unique ways people around the world celebrate Mother’s Day!


  1. United States: Flowers and Breakfast in Bed


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In the United States, Mother’s Day is often marked by giving flowers, carnations being especially popular, and serving mothers breakfast in bed. This is essentially to give the women in our lives a much needed break, a day full of love and pampering, to show them how we value their contributions to the family. Family gatherings and special meals are also common, and often children will be encouraged to make hand-crafted gifts or cards to express their love.


  1. Sweden: Last Sunday of May


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A lot of the ways the Swedish celebrate Mother’s Day coincide with the US. Handmade gifts, special meals and celebratory gatherings are popular ways we choose to celebrate the day. But unlike a number of other countries, Mother’s Day is celebrated on the last Sunday of May in Sweden. This date is significant because it also marks the beginning of spring, where the days become longer and the flowers begin to bloom, which symbolizes rebirth and renewal and perfectly aligns with the context of Mother’s Day. 


  1. United Kingdom: Mothering Sunday


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Mothering Sunday in the UK falls on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Historically, it is a day when people return to their “mother church”, or matrice, which is a term depicting the church as a ‘mother’ in that she functions through nourishment and protection of the believer. Like other countries, in the modern day, most British people choose to celebrate the day with gift-giving and family gatherings, along with inclusion of traditional dishes like a Simnel cake.


  1. Japan: Haha no Hi


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In Japan, Mother’s Day is known as “Haha no Hi”, and is traditionally celebrated by having children draw pictures of their mothers and giving them red carnations, which symbolize purity and sweetness. Families will also come together for the special occasion and cook meals to the mother’s preference to honor her.


  1. Mexico: Las Mananitas


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Mother’s Day in Mexico, or “Dia de las Madres”, is celebrated on May 10th with serenades of the traditional song “Las Mananitas”. Families are often encouraged to attend special church services, and children will present their mothers with flowers, handmade gifts, and prepare special meals much like other cultures.


  1. Ethiopia: Antrosht Festival


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In Ethiopia, Mother’s Day is a part of the three-day Antrosht festival, which is held in the fall. Coinciding with the end of the rainy season, families will gather for a feast, where daughters bring vegetables and cheese, and sons provide meat. Songs, dancing, and celebrations continue, with family and motherhood being the central highlight. 


  1. France: Fete Des Meres


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The French celebrate Mother’s Day on the last Sunday of May or the first Sunday of June. Along with the traditional gift giving, often mothers will be honored with a special flower shaped cake. The tradition of honoring mothers was revived after World War One in France, to pay tribute to the women who lost their sons and husbands during the war.


  1. Thailand: Queen Sirikit’s Birthday


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Mother’s Day in Thailand is celebrated on August 12th, which is the birthday of Queen Sirikit. She is regarded as the mother of the nation, and therefore coincides perfectly with motherly celebrations. The day begins with ceremonies and offerings to Buddhist monks, then continues within the family with children honoring their mothers with gifts of jasmine flowers.


  1. India: Durga Puja


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In India, Hindus honor the goddess Durga during a ten day festival known as Durga Puja. The celebration is an old tradition, dating back to the sixteenth century, and is considered both a religious ceremony and a chance for family reunions. A popular story told during this time is one of Durga returning to her parents home to introduce her own children to her parents. In some cases, families can spend weeks preparing food, gathering gifts and decorating their homes for the occasion.


  1. Peru: A Week Long Celebration


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Mother’s Day is celebrated for a week in Peru. Part of the celebrations is family dinners, lunches, parties and trips throughout the week. There are often art and musical performances around the city and mothers can visit popular venues like museums, exhibitions and festivals for free. Children are expected to shower their mothers with gifts and flowers, and even recite poems or stories for them. And in Peru, they also honor mothers who have passed. Families will visit graves of the deceased women in their lives and offer flowers and balloons. 


  1. Germany: Muttertag


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It is believed by many that the modern Mother’s Day celebrations originated in Germany, sometime in the Middle Ages. It was a day for families to visit each other and wish a fruitful spring and new life to their relatives. The day was extremely important during the German Reich, and mothers who had many children were awarded Crosses of Honor, but after the First World War, Mother’s Day celebrations became more neutral and all encompassing, celebrated much like other Western countries. One unique aspect in Germany is that it’s not uncommon to present mothers with surprise trips to a day at the spa or vacation!


  1. Argentina: Mother’s Day in October


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In Argentina, Mother’s Day was originally celebrated on October 11th, which coincided with the celebration of the Maternity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. But after the Second Vatican Council, the celebration was moved to the third Sunday of October. Argentina is the only country in the world that celebrates Mother's Day on this date!


  1. Australia: White Chrysanthemums


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The first Mother’s Day in Australia was celebrated in 1910 with special church services, but was not popular until 1920, with gift-giving coming into tradition only in 1924. This tradition for Australia was initiated by a Sydney woman, Janet Heyden, who was inspired to collect charitable gifts for lonely, old mothers in Newington hospital who had lost husbands and sons during the First World War. Because Mother’s Day takes place during the autumn in Australia, and carnations are a spring flower, white chrysanthemums are traditionally gifted instead.


  1. Belgium: Mother’s Day In August